Coaching and leadership development business h2h is turning red today, Wednesday, February 22, to help “shine a light” on a devastating brain condition.

The team at h2h are lending their support to World Encephalitis Day to raise awareness of the condition, an inflammation of the brain, which affects 500,000 people globally each year.

The campaign, led by The Encephalitis Society, will also see world-famous landmarks go red, including Niagara Falls; the fountains at Trafalgar Square, London; the Swan Bell Tower in Perth, Australia; Blackpool Tower; The Convention Centre Dublin; The Peace Bridge, which links the U.S.A with Canada, among other buildings and landmarks.

Supporters of World Encephalitis Day are also wearing items of red clothing and sharing them on social media using the hashtag, #RED4WED.

Managing director of h2h, Susan Binnersley, says: “Encephalitis is a debilitating condition that can strike without warning and can have devastating consequences. It’s hugely important that people are made aware of this condition.

“The h2h team are wearing red to show our support and to help raise awareness of this condition and of the important work of the Encephalitis Society, which is a local charity but delivers a global impact.”

Dr Ava Easton, Chief Executive of The Encephalitis Society, adds: “Imagine going to sleep one night and waking up the next day a completely different person – this is essentially what it can be like for some survivors of encephalitis.

“World Encephalitis Day is the most important day of the year for people who have been affected by encephalitis. It is the day when we all come together to make as much noise as possible about the condition as possible so we can educate the public and health professionals.”

In the UK alone, encephalitis affects 6,000 people annually – more than certain types of meningitis and motor neurone disease and yet remains less well known.

Those who survive are often left with an acquired brain injury, the consequence of which means a return to work or education can be difficult.

Encephalitis can affect abilities such as concentration, attention, thinking, memory, judgement and inhibition, while leaving a legacy of additional challenges such as epilepsy or fatigue.

For more information, visit www.worldencephalitisday.org